Playgoers Set to Spook Audiences

September 28, 2015
Lord Grey (Chris Bissex-Williams) finds David (James Symonds) alone in the dark. (PHOTO: PHIL MANSELL)

Lord Grey (Chris Bissex-Williams) finds David (James Symonds) alone in the dark. (PHOTO: PHIL MANSELL)

Theatregoers will get goose bumps – and giggles – at ‘The Haunting’, an adaptation of the ghost stories of Charles Dickens.

The intriguing title might lead people to supposing that this latest production from Newport Playgoers is a dark and moody social commentary of 19th century England based on a lesser known Dickens book.

In fact, it’s a humorous parody of Victorian horror stories mixed with séance-trickery complete with tapping and knocking, phantom footsteps, doors opening and closing of their own accord, ghostly apparitions, objects flying off walls and the occasional blood-curdling scream.

Lord Grey (Chris Bissex-Williams) employs David (James Symonds) to catalogue his estate's impressive library of rare books. (PHOTO: PHIL MANSELL)

Lord Grey (Chris Bissex-Williams) employs David (James Symonds) to catalogue his estate’s impressive library of rare books. (PHOTO: PHIL MANSELL)

The cleverly written play has all the elements needed to evoke Victorian theatre with an intriguing storyline and unravelling mysteries. Two characters bring the narrative alive – the esoteric and reserved Lord Grey who employs fresh-faced young David to catalogue his estate’s impressive library.

David (James Symonds) tries to convince Lord Grey (Chris Bissex-Williams) that the mysterious phenomena are real. (PHOTO: PHIL MANSELL)

David (James Symonds) tries to convince Lord Grey (Chris Bissex-Williams) that the mysterious phenomena are real. (PHOTO: PHIL MANSELL)

In an ancient, crumbling mansion, they stumble across a dark and terrifying secret that will change their lives forever. As a series of strange and unexplained events conspires to keep David from his work, he realises that in order to convince his sceptical employer that the mysterious phenomena are real they must journey together to the very edge of terror to discover the source of the terrifying visitations.

A genuinely spine-tingling Victorian ghost story, ‘The Haunting’ is at the Dolman Theatre from Tuesday 13th – Friday 16th October at 7.15 pm, with a matinee performance on Saturday 17th at 2.30 pm. To book tickets call 01633 263670 or visit www.dolmantheatre.co.uk.

Advertisements

Playgoers Start Season with Roman Romp!

September 10, 2015

Newport Playgoers have started their 93rd season of plays with a bang – their production of ‘Up Pompeii’ has had the audiences rolling in the aisles this week.

Head slave Lurcio (Paul Cotton) tries to juggle everyone's problems. (PHOTO: PHIL MANSELL)

Head slave Lurcio (Paul Cotton) tries to juggle everyone’s problems. (PHOTO: PHIL MANSELL)

This Roman romp whisks audiences back to ancient Pompeii where saucy shenanigans are played out against the backdrop of an ominously rumbling volcano.

This lively production, directed by Playgoers’ favourite Richard Dymond,  is based on the hugely popular comedy TV series starring Frankie Howerd. Few who saw it can forget the wonderful characters whose names speak for themselves: Ludicrus, Ammonia, Nauseus, Erotica, Voluptua and Suspenda.

There’s still a chance to catch it at the Dolman Theatre – the final two performances are on Friday at 7.15pm and Saturday at 2.30pm.

Other forthcoming attractions include ‘The Ladykillers’ based on the classic Ealing comedy and ‘The Graduate’ featuring the seductive Mrs Robinson.


All Set for Roman Scandals

September 1, 2015

Newport Playgoers plan to whisk audiences back to ancient Pompeii where saucy shenanigans are played out against the backdrop of an ominously rumbling volcano.

Head slave Lurcio (Paul Cotton) tries to juggle everyone's problems. (PHOTO: PHIL MANSELL)

Head slave Lurcio (Paul Cotton) tries to juggle everyone’s problems. (PHOTO: PHIL MANSELL)

Up Pompeii, which launches Playgoers’ 93rd season, was a hugely popular comedy TV series starring Frankie Howerd, and few who saw it can forget the wonderful characters whose names speak for themselves: Ludicrus, Ammonia, Nauseus, Erotica, Voluptua, Senna and Suspenda.

Ludicrus (Eamonn Corbett) and his wife Ammonia (Gwen Livingstone) are concerned about their daughter Erotica's (Olivia Harvey) writing. (PHOTO: PHIL MANSELL)

Ludicrus (Eamonn Corbett) and his wife Ammonia (Gwen Livingstone) are concerned about their daughter Erotica’s (Olivia Harvey) writing. (PHOTO: PHIL MANSELL)

Orchestrating both plot and characters is the head slave Lurcio, who becomes embroiled in the sexual liaisons of his master’s household, as all its members cheat, double cross and generally misbehave.

Lurcio conveys his thoughts to the audience through a series of innuendos and double entendres while trying to help his master’s daughter Erotica, rescue escaped slave girl, Voluptua, listen to Nauseus’s love poetry and enlist the help of local nymphomaniac Suspenda.

Roman soldiers Kretinus (Ryan Salter) and Trecherus (Owen Barrett) display their incompetence. (PHOTO: PHIL MANSELL)

Roman soldiers Kretinus (Ryan Salter) and Trecherus (Owen Barrett) display their incompetence. (PHOTO: PHIL MANSELL)

The play was originally written for Frankie Howerd to repeat his success in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, in which he played a similar role. If you like your history treated in a light-hearted and somewhat risqué manner, this is the play for you.

‘Up Pompeii’ is at the Dolman Theatre from Tuesday 8th – Saturday 12th September at 7.15 pm, with a matinee performance on Saturday at 2.30 pm. To book tickets call 01633 263670 or visit www.dolmantheatre.co.uk.